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Square Dance Club

Saratoga, California

 
Call list for review during weekly Zoom meetings, by date of introduction.
(descriptions are alphabetically below)
22 JuneCatch n, Mini Chase, Peel/Trail to a Diamond
29 JuneCriss Cross Your Neighbor, Kick Off
6 JulyRecoil, Split Swap
13 JulyShazam, Wheel the Ocean/Sea
20 JulyCross Back, Touch By fraction by fraction
27 JulyCircle to a Wave, Couple Up, Turn to a Line
3 AugustDrop direction, tag Your Neighbor, Travel Thru
10 AugustHop, Like a call, Stack the Line, Vertical call
17 AugustCatch call n, Rotate fraction, Single Rotate fraction
24 AugustBounce somebody, the Hinge/Lock/Top, Reverse Cut/Flip the Diamond
31 Augustthe K, Ripple n, Single call
7 SeptemberSingle File call, Split Trade Circulate, Swap the Wave
14 SeptemberCross and Wheel, Patch somebody, Perk Up
21 September1/4 (or 3/4) Mix, Chisel Thru, Single Cross Trade and Wheel
28 SeptemberChain the Square, Stable call, Swap the Top
5 October1/4 (or 3/4) Wheel the Ocean/Sea, Counter, Little More
12 OctoberExchange the formations, direction Loop n, Scoot the Diamond
19 OctoberCrazy call, Ease Off, Here Comes the Judge / Sock It To Me, Rotary call
26 OctoberHocus Pocus, Initially/Finally concept call, Reach Out
2 NovemberLatch On fraction, Rally, Walk Out to a Wave
9 NovemberCheckpoint call by call, Invert the Column fraction, Plan Ahead, Truck
16 NovemberCross Ramble, Detour, Expand the Column, Scatter Circulate
23 NovemberCross Concentric call, Follow to a Diamond, Link Up, Step and call
30 November"anything" call-that-starts-with-circulate, Alter and Circulate, Delight/Dilemma
7 DecemberCriss Cross the Shadow, Once Removed call, Wind the Bobbin
14 DecemberDodge call, Lines call Thru
21 DecemberNo additional calls - just practice on those above.
28 DecemberNo additional calls - just practice on those above.
4 JanuaryFlare Out to a Line, Grand Chain Eight
11 JanuaryHubs/Rims Trade Back, Snap the Lock
18 JanuaryFollow Your Leader, Unwrap the formation

"anything" call-that-starts-with-circulate

This construct is usually referred to as the "anything concept" even though, unlike most concepts, it has no name of its own that is spoken when it is used. And "anything" is misleading, because depending on what that "anything" is, it is spoken different ways. But the general idea is that the "anything" replaces the Circulate at the beginning of the named call.

Only calls which have as their first part (all 8) Circulate can be modified in this way. As a practical matter, at C-2 and C-3A, this means: Coordinate, Motivate, Percolate, and Perk Up.

If the Circulate is to be replaced by some other kind of circulate, it is usual to leave out the word "Circulate". For example "Split Motivate" means Split Circulate then Finish Motivate; "Trade Percolate" means do a Trade Circulate then Finish Percolate.

If the Circulate is to be replaced by some kind of Counter Rotate, then the word "Rotate" is typically omitted. For example, "Counter Perk Up" means Counter Rotate then Finish Perk Up; "Split Counter Coordinate" means Split Counter Rotate then Finish Coordinate.

If the Circulate is to be replaced by any other call, then it is common to include the connector "er's". For example, "Walk Out to a Wave er's Motivate" means Walk Out to a Wave and then Finish Motivate. This "er's" is not strictly required, but many callers always include it, to make clear where the name of the replacement call ends, to make clear that this combining construct is intended, and to avoid what might otherwise seem like ambiguous cases.

References:

1/4 (or 3/4) Mix

This is a three-part call, usually starting from a box:
  • Those who can turn 1/4 by the right.
  • New centers Cross Run.
  • New centers Trade.

Note that although this is very similar to Swing and Mix, for this call the first turn is defined to be by the right. (Of course this can be changed by the addition of "Left" or "Any Hand".) There is also 3/4 Mix, which is the same except that the first turn is 3/4.

References:

1/4 (or 3/4) Wheel the Ocean/Sea

These are variations on Wheel the Ocean/Sea, starting from a two-faced line rather than a box. For the 1/4 variation, starting in a left-handed two-faced line, each half of the line does an As Couples 1/4 Left (1/2 Wheel Around). For the 3/4 variation, starting in a right-handed two-faced line, each half does an As Couples 3/4 Left (Wheel Around 1 1/2). Then the rest of the call is the same as for Wheel the Ocean/Sea - belles cross, or belles walk beaus dodge.

Note that for these variations everybody does the initial turning action, the same amount, either 1/4 or 3/4.

References:

Alter and Circulate

From parallel waves:
  1. Arm Turn 1/2
  2. Centers Cast Off 3/4 while ends U-Turn Back
  3. Very centers Trade while ends circulate around the outside
  4. Counter Rotate each diamond 1/2
  5. Flip the Diamond
This is a five part call. Note that without the third part, it would just be an ordinary Alter the Wave, and this call is often modified in similar ways, e.g., turning the diamonds a different amount or replacing the last part with something different.

References:

Bounce somebody

This is a two-part call, starting from a two-faced line:
  • Veer Left/Right (to make back-to-back couples)
  • the designated dancers U-Turn Back in the veering direction

Note that
  • The veering direction is not specified directly, as it is already determined by the handedness of the line (e.g., from a right-handed two-faced line it will be a Veer Right).
  • Who should u-turn back is evaluated at the start of the action, before the veer, even though the turning doesn't happen until after the veer. This can make a difference, e.g., for "Bounce the Leads" from parallel two-faced lines.
  • The direction of the u-turn back is in the "same direction" as the veer. That means if the veering is to the right (clockwise around the center of the line), those dancers who u-turn back will be turning to their own right (clockwise).

The result will be some kind of 2x2 box, with the facing directions depending on which dancers were designated.

References:

Catch n

This is a three-part call, starting with facing couples:
  • Square Thru n to a Wave
  • Centers Trade
  • Step and Fold

You should expect to find yourself in a mini-wave box, right- or left-handed depending on whether n was even or odd.

References:

Catch call n

This is a three-part call, starting with facing couples:
  • Square Thru n to a Wave
  • do the named call
  • Step and Fold

This is a generalization of "Catch n", with the Centers Trade replaced by a different call. For example, "Catch Spin the Top 3" means Square Thru 3 to a Wave, then Spin the Top, then Step and Fold. The ending formation will be some kind of box, but what kind will depend on the call. It could even be a t-boned box, e.g., "Catch Switch to a Diamond 2".

References:

Chain the Square

Starting from an eight-chain, all right pull by. Then the new ends Courtesy Turn and Veer Left to become the trailing couples of parallel two faced lines. Meanwhile the dancers who came into the center from opposite directions meet and do a Courtesy Turn, with the original beau turning the original belle until the original belle is facing 180 degrees from his/her original direction, and walk forward (or As Couples Extend) to become leaders of those same two-faced lines.

There are different ways of describing how the dancers who meet in the middle do their Courtesy Turn:

  • They first step to a left-handed wave (as in Rotary Spin) and the centers of that wave (the original outside beaus) U-Turn Back to their left and then Courtesy Turn the other dancer an additional 180 degrees.
  • They first (immediately after they finish the right pull by, so they are facing each other) do a 1/4 Out to become a couple (as in Grand Chain 8) and then do a Courtesy Turn 270 degrees.
  • It doesn't matter which way you think of it, because nobody actually does either of these things, rigidly, step by step. Both dancers just turn as necessary to allow the action as a whole to go smoothly. The overall feel of the Courtesy Turn here should already be familiar to anybody learning this call, because it's pretty much the same as what the dancers do in the Basic call "Ladies Chain".

Many people find this call difficult to do with phantoms, especially if they are starting on the end. Here are some hints to keep in mind:

  • This call always ends in right-handed two-faced lines. If you start as an end you will be part of a lead couple when you are done, if you start in the center you will be part of a trailing couple when you are done.
  • Everybody who starts as a beau ends as a beau. Everybody who starts as a belle ends as a belle.
  • Making note of whether you are starting as a beau or belle is doubly useful if you start on the end and the dancer who you meet is a phantom. If you are a beau, you will be turning that phantom, and turning a total of 360 degrees to end facing the same direction you started. If you are a belle, the phantom will be turning you only 180 degrees, to end facing back the way you came.

References:

Checkpoint call by call

For Checkpoint, the dancers are considered as two separate groups.

The first group consists of the "the centers of each side". Common cases are a tidal wave, in which case this means the centers of each wave (considered together as a wave of four), and point-to-point diamonds, in which case this means the centers of each diamond (considered as a box of four). But it doesn't have to be four dancers -- for example, from ordinary columns if the centers hinge to form a center wave, it is just the two dancers at the end of that wave.

The second group is everybody else (again commonly four dancers, but not always).

The dancers in the first group do the first call, and take positions on the outside of the resulting formation. The remaining dancers do the second call and end in the center.

References:

Chisel Thru

This is a three-part call, starting from facing lines:
  • Concentric Pass In
  • ends Pass In while centers Pass Out
  • all Pass In

References:

Circle fraction to a Wave

This is a two-part call, starting with facing couples:
  • Circle Left the fraction
  • Beaus Walk while Belles Dodge

The result is a right-handed box. The default fraction is 1/4, and in that case it is almost always omitted, i.e, the caller just says "Circle to a Wave".

Note that although the name of this call is very similar to "Single Circle to a Wave", they differ in two important ways: (1) The circling action is done by four dancers (facing couples) rather than two dancers, and (2) the default turning amount is 1/4, rather than 1/2.

References:

Counter

Most commonly done from a 3/4 tag, this is a call where the ends and centers act independently.

The ends separate from each other and meet an end from the other side the square, Touch 1/2, and Step and Fold, to become ends of parallel lines

The centers Cast Off 3/4 and then Counter Rotate. They most commonly start in a wave, but could also start in a mini-wave box or a line. Note that the type of Counter Rotate will vary with the starting formation, specifically:

  • starting in a wave: arm turn 3/4 (now in a box) followed by an ordinary Box Counter Rotate
  • starting in a box: arm turn 3/4 (now in a wave) followed by a Lockit
  • starting in a line: "push cast" 3/4 (now facing couples) followed by a Pass In
The combination "Scoot and Counter" from a 1/4 tag is very common, and means to do a Scoot Back and then a Counter. Note, however, that unlike Scoot and Little and its derivatives, in the case of Scoot and Counter the direction that the ends go is not affected by the handedness of the center wave; the ends separate and go in opposite directions regardless.

References:

Couple Up

This is Split (or Box) Circulate followed by the leads U-Turn Back. If you are already a trailer after the circulate, you don't do anything more. So at the end, everybody is a trailer. Most commonly this means you will be in facing couples, but if the starting formation is t-boned then the ending formation will be t-boned as well.

The same idea of the leads doing a U-Turn Back can be combined with other kinds of circulates. The convention is to give the name of the type of circulate (leaving out the word "circulate") followed by "Couple Up". For example, "Trade Couple Up" means do a Trade Circulate and then the leads U-Turn Back.

References:

Crazy call

The Crazy concept indicates that the named call should be applied multiple times, alternately "on each side" and "in the center". Without a fraction (also referred to as "full Crazy"), the named call is done four times: (1) on each side, (2) in the center, (3) on each side again, (4) in the center again.

If the named call is circulate or counter rotate, neither the "box" nor "split" modifier is used, since it's understood that it is going to be done by four dancers. So from parallel waves or columns "Crazy Circulate" means Split Circulate, Centers Box Circulate, Split Circulate, Centers Box Circulate.

A fraction can be added to change the number of times the call is done. For example, "1/2 Crazy Scoot Back" means each half does a Scoot Back, then the center box does a Scoot Back. The modifier "Reverse" means to start with the centers rather than each side. For example, from an hourglass "1/2 Reverse Crazy Flip the Diamond" means that the center diamond does a Flip the Diamond and then the two resulting diamonds each do a Flip the Diamond.

If the call changes the overall formation, then who makes up "each side" or "in the center" may change. For example, in a 1/2 Crazy Follow Your Neighbor from parallel waves, after the first Follow Your Neighbor it is the dancers in the new center box (the original trailers, not the original centers) who do the second one. If there are two ways to divide the overall formation, the one that makes sense for the given call is used. If that doesn't help -- the primary examples being "Counter Rotate" and "Recycle" -- then do it in each box.

References:

Criss Cross the Shadow

This is a variation on Cast a Shadow in which all the dancers do some kind of "crossing" action. From parallel lines:
  • The ends do the same action as for Cast a Shadow but taking opposite hands.
  • The lead centers do a cloverleaf action in the same direction as usual but go to the far center spot.
  • The trailing centers veer inward to take opposite hands, Hinge, then step ahead to become lead centers.

References:

Criss Cross Your Neighbor

From a mini-wave box, the trailers do a Cross Your Neighbor and Spread (ending as ends of a wave) while the leaders 1/2 Box Circulate and Cross Run (becoming centers of a wave). If you started in a right-handed box you should expect to find yourself in a left-handed wave, and vice versa.

References:

Cross and Wheel

From parallel lines consisting of couples (e.g, two-faced lines, lines back to back):
  • Couples Hinge
  • As Couples Step and Fold

"Single Cross and Wheel" is the same action done by individual dancers, starting from a box: Hinge followed by Step and Fold.

Note: These two calls are part of a larger family of calls, distinguished by the addition of the words "Grand" and "Trade".

References:

Cross Back

From a box, leaders U-Turn Back while the trailers pull by with the outside hand. If you started in a right-handed box you should expect to find yourself in a left-handed box, and vice versa.

References:

Cross Concentric call

The dancers are considered as two separate groups, the centers and the outsides. Each group does the named call:
  • The centers do the call and then arrange themselves around the outside, following the same rules as for the outsides when doing Concentric.
  • The outsides do the call and end in the center.
As with Concentric, if the new outsides are in a 1x4 (line, wave, column) or a diamond (or 1/4 or 3/4 tag), there is only one way for them to arrange themselves. If they started in a box that was oriented as the centers of lines, then they finish as ends of lines; if they started in a box that was oriented as the centers of columns, they finish as ends of columns. If they started in a 1x4 or diamond but finish in a box, then they spread apart in the direction perpendicular to their original long axis.

References:

Cross Ramble

Cross Ramble is like Ramble except everybody goes to the other side. The ends do a Cross Cast Back instead of a Cast Back. The centers all do a Cross Fold to face, rather than a Single Wheel. (This puts them facing the same person as for a Ramble, but at the other end of their original wave.) Everybody then does a Slide Thru, just as for Ramble.

References:

Delight/Dilemma

Normally from a 3/4 tag:
  • The ends 1/4 right (for Delight) or 1/4 left (for Dilemma), then circulate twice.
  • The centers Swing, Slip, Slip, Cast Off 3/4.
These calls are very commonly combined with a tagging call, identified using the same shorthand names used for "tag Back" and "tag Your Neighbor" along with the connector "er's". This means do the tagging call to the 3/4 tag position, and then do the action of Delight or Dilemma. For example "Vertical Tag er's Dilemma" means do a Vertical Tag 3/4, then Dilemma, and "Flip er's Delight" means do a Flip the Line 3/4, then Delight. Occasionally other calls in which dancers move forward to form a 3/4 tag are combined the same way, e.g., "Extender's Delight".

References:

Detour

The centers Counter Rotate 1/4, while the ends 1/2 Zoom and Hinge.

References:

Dodge call

The dancers are considered as two separate groups, the centers (who must be in some kind of 2x2 box) and the outsides:
  • The centers do their part of a Walk and Dodge (in the center).
  • The outsides do their part of the named call.
Note that the call can be an eight-person call, in which case the outsides do their part of it. For example, for "Dodge Hocus Pocus" the outsides do two O Circulates.

References:

Drop direction

Normally called from a diamond, the centers walk forward as if they were doing an Extend from a 1/4 tag formation, becoming the leaders in a box. The others turn 1/4 in the named direction and move to occupy remaining spots of the box. Depending on the direction given, those dancers might end up as either leaders or trailers - they might also be t-boned to the original centers.

Note that the ending spot for the original points is determined entirely by the handedness of the original centers -- it does not depend on the named direction.

References:

Ease Off

Usually from a 2x4 with ends in line orientation, the ends Zing while the centers circulate (in the center) and then Face In. If the starting formation was any kind of parallel lines, the result is beginning double pass thru.

References:

Exchange the Boxes/Diamonds

To perform an "Exchange", dancers in two adjacent similar formations circulate, first in their own formation, and then in the adjacent formation. The total number of circulates for a full Exchange is equal to the number of positions in a single formation of that type. Dancers circulate in their own formation until they reach their "exchange point", which is the point in their normal circulate path when they are closest to, but not facing away from, the center of the overall formation. Their next circulate is into the other formation, crossing over to the spot in that formation which corresponds to the one where they would have gone for a normal circulate. Once they have crossed over into the other formation, they stay to the outside of any dancers who are still circulating in their original formation, but finish at the end of the call on the footprints of the original formation when possible.

For Exchange the Boxes, the dancers may be in either column orientation or line orientation, but in either case the "exchange point" is when a dancer becomes a trailer in the center, and in either case the crossing over is a diagonal circulate in the center box.

For Exchange the Diamonds, the "exchange point" is when a dancer reaches a very center position, and the crossing over is like an Interlocked Diamond Circulate.

References:

Expand the Column

Almost always from some kind of parallel columns:
  • The centers flip away (like a Run outward).
  • The ends Column Circulate twice.
Note that after two circulates, the ends will now be in the center, regardless of their original facing direction. This means that from any kind of parallel columns, the result will be some kind of parallel lines. From ordinary right- or left-handed columns, the result is parallel waves of the opposite handedness.

References:

Flare Out to a Line

Almost always from parallel two faced lines:
  • The leaders (normal or Reverse) Turn to a Line, away from the center of the set.
  • The trailers 1/2 circulate.
From parallel two-faced lines, the result is an as couples wave of opposite handedness.

References:

Follow to a Diamond

From a box of four, the trailers Follow Your Neighbor and Spread to become the ends of a four-person formation, while the leaders Box Circulate 1 1/2 to become the centers.

From a mini-wave box, the result is a diamond. From a typical t-boned box, the result is a wave.

References:

Follow Your Leader

From parallel waves:
  • The trailers step straight forward and take hands (as for Scoot Back or Follow Your Neighbor), Cast Off 3/4, and then step forward to become #1 and #2 in a column.
  • The leaders 1/2 Split Circulate, which puts them in tandem, then Tandem Cross Fold to become #3 and #4 in a column.

Note that everybody starts out moving and turning in the same direction as for Follow Your Neighbor, and that the result is parallel columns of the same handedness as the original waves.

References:

Grand Chain Eight

There are three formations from which this is commonly called. There are various definitions listed in the references which work from all three positions, but the cases feel different enough that many dancers simply learn them as if they were three different calls:
  • From facing lines, everybody right pull by and move along (or Bend the Line), then each beau courtesy turn the facing belle until everyone is in an eight-chain formation.
  • From eight-chain: everybody right pull by, the new ends do a regular courtesy turn (180 degrees) to end as #4 in columns, while the center beau turns the facing center belle until they are facing in as centers of lines.
  • From beginning DPT: centers right pull by then all the beaus courtesy turn their facing belle until everyone is in facing lines.
Note that regardless of the starting formation, all the beaus courtesy turn somebody and end up as beaus in the resulting couples while all the belles end up as belles in the resulting couples.

Hints when dancing with phantoms:

  • If you are standing as if you could be in facing lines, assume you are in facing lines.
  • If anybody is standing as if #2 in a column, assume you are in an eight-chain formation.
  • If you and all other real dancers are standing as if #4 in a column, then it could be either the eight-chain or the beginning double-pass-thru case. But in most cases which one will be obvious from the previous call.

References:

Here Comes the Judge / Sock It to Me

These calls are applied to a four-person line with both ends facing the same direction. For "Here Comes the Judge", the end belle "circulates" (does an Ends Trade or Loop 2) to the other end of the line, while everybody else flips over one spot toward the vacated end. "Sock It To Me" is the mirror image of that, with the end beau going to the opposite end. Note that although the way the relevant end is identified is different, the action itself is the same as for the call Out Roll Circulate.

These calls are most commonly applied to back-to-back lines, in which case the result is facing lines. But regardless of the type of line, everybody ends facing the opposite wall from when they started.

References:

the Hinge/Lock/Top

These are combining forms, with "Lock" being a short-hand for Lockit and "Top" being a short-hand for Fan the Top. They can be added to the end of many calls, and "Hinge" and "Lock" can also be used to start a combination. Examples: "Lock the Hinge", "Hinge the Top", "Beau Hop the Lock".

Note that there are many calls whose names end with "the Top" -- in some cases the action of the call ends with a Fan the Top, but in many other cases it doesn't (e.g., Relay the Top). A "the Top" at the end of a call should only be interpreted as meaning "add a Fan the Top" if the phrase doesn't have another meaning.

The short forms "Lock" and "Top" are also sometimes used with the "Catch call n" construct, e.g., "Catch Lock 3".

References:

Hocus Pocus

Most commonly from parallel lines or columns, but also from any other formation where it makes sense for the outsides and centers to do their parts:
  • the outsides do two O Circulates while
  • the centers Trade
Note that the outside dancers normally form only half of an "O", usually all the ends or all the centers. They do their circulates in the "phantom O" of which they are part. If they start in end-of-columns spots, two circulates will bring them into end-of-lines spots, and vice versa. So from the most common types of starting formations, Hocus Pocus changes parallel columns into parallel lines, and vice versa.

For 1/2 Hocus Pocus, each outside dancer does just one O Circulate, and the centers do a Hinge.

References:

somebody Hop

This is a two-part call:
  • designated dancers walk while the others dodge
  • Hinge
This is most commonly called from facing couples, e.g., Girl Hop, which means the girls walk while the boys dodge, or Beau Hop, which means the beaus walk while the belles dodge. However, sometimes it is used in other ways, with other designators like Leader, Trailer, or "everyone". For example, from facing couples "Everyone Hop" would mean everybody walks forward (like a Pass Thru) and then the hinge would be a partner hinge.

References:

Hubs/Rims Trade Back

From lines or a thar, with "hubs" referring to the original centers and "rims"referring to the original ends:
  • The ends and centers Trade with each other.
  • The designated dancers Circulate.
Note that for "Hubs Trade Back", the second part is Ends Circulate, because they had been the "hubs". For "Rims Trade Back", the second part is Centers Circulate, because they had been the "rims".

The word "Back" can be replaced by the name of a call, in which case the designated dancers do that call rather than a circulate.

References:

Initially/Finally concept call

Initially means to apply the named concept only to the first part of the named call (and do the remaining parts normally). Finally means to apply the named concept only to the last part of the named call (and do the parts before that normally).

Initially and Finally are often referred to as "meta-concepts" because they can be understood as modifying a concept. So in "Initially Tandem Swing Thru", the "Initially" can be thought of as modifying the concept "Tandem", creating a different concept "Initially Tandem", which then gets applied to the call Swing Thru. But it also works to just think of it as "taking two arguments", a concept and a call. Either way, the meaning is that the first part (half by the right) should be done Tandem, then the rest (half by the left) should be done normally.

The named concept is most commonly something defined specifically as a "concept" (e.g., Tandem, Stable, or Once Removed). But there are several other kinds of call modifiers that can be selectively applied to either the first or last part of a call in the same way:

  • fractions/multiples: "Initially 1/2 Spin the Top" means do a Hinge then a Fan the Top; "Finally Twice Recoil" means do a Box Recycle, then a Step and Fold, then another Step and Fold
  • dancer designators: "Initially Boys Shazam" means just the boys Hinge, then everybody does a U-Turn Back; "Finally Centers Tag Your Neighbor" means everybody does a 1/2 Tag and then just the center box does a Follow Your Neighbor
  • calls/constructs that are syntactically like a concept, in that they require another call on the right to complete the description of the entire action (e.g., "Clover and call", "Tally Ho But call"): "Finally Transfer and Couple Up" (from parallel columns) means do a Split Circulate (all but the last part of Couple Up) then a "Transfer and Leads U-Turn Back".

References:

Invert the Column fraction

Normally from parallel columns: The dancers turn away from the center of the formation and walk, single file, in the direction opposite the way they started. Each dancer follows the one immediately in front, as if they were doing part of a Tandem Peel Off.

For a full Invert the Column, everybody ends up in a column again facing the other way, with the #1 dancer in the #1 position again, and since there is nobody remaining in the original column everybody slides together to form parallel columns again. Left-handed columns become right-handed columns and vice versa.

If a fraction is given, only that fraction of the original column performs this action, with the remaining dancers moving forward but remaining in their original columm, far enough to make a compact formation.

For example, from columns of four Invert the Column 1/2 means that just the first two dancers of each column "invert"; when they line up with the remaining two dancers they form a mini-wave box of the opposite handedness, on each side. The overall result from parallel columns of four is parallel waves of the opposite handedness.

For "Invert the Column 1/4" or "Invert the Column 3/4", the resulting formation on each side is a 3x1 tandem-based triangle.

This call can also be applied to parallel columns of other sizes. For example, from columns of three "Invert the Column 1/3" means that just one dancer in each column "inverts", leaving two in the original column, and the result on each side is an ordinary tandem-based triangle.

"Cross Invert the Column" means that rather than doing the "invert" action on their own side, those dancers go to the other side of the whole formation, as if they were doing a Tandem Trail Off instead of a Tandem Peel Off.

References:

the K

The centers Trade while the ends U-Turn Back away from the center. This can be applied to any four-person or eight-person formation that has centers and ends; if the eight-person formation consists of two four-person formations that themselves have centers and ends (e.g., a tidal wave), then it is done in each four-person formation.

Note: The turning direction for the ends matters if the call is fractionalized (1/2) or followed by Roll.

From facing lines, the combination "Cross the K" means Cross Trail Thru followed by the K.

References:

Kick Off

This is related to Run, and has the same feature that two dancers are involved but only one is designated. The designated dancer does a Run and Roll, while the person who wasn't mentioned does a Partner Tag. You should expect to find yourself in tandem with the other person, with the person who was designated ending up as the trailer.

References:

Latch On fraction

This is a two-part call:
  • Right Roll to a Wave
  • Arm Turn the given fraction
The fraction can be omitted – the default is 1/4.

References:

Like a call

"Like a" is a concept that means "do the last part of". So "Like a Shazam" means U-Turn Back. The most common usage is "Like a Couple Up", which means that just the leads U-Turn Back. Note that in general this is different from "Finish", which means "do all but the first part of", but in the case of a two-part call they would be the same.

Lines call Thru

The dancers are considered as two separate groups, the outsides and the centers:
  • The outsides circulate one spot (around the outside).
  • The centers do the named call (in the center).
Note that the outsides are most commonly ends of lines, or in that position in some other eight-person formation (e.g., the points of twin diamonds or an hourglass). However they could also be in a diamond (e.g., the points of a galaxy).

References:

Link Up

Normally from parallel two-faced lines:
  • The lead couple does an "Out Anchor 1/4" (Cast Off 1/4 but with the end dancer remaining in the same spot), Roll (so they become a tandem), and Press Ahead (so they become ends of lines).
  • The trailing couples 1/2 Circulate, forming a two-faced line in the center, and then Crossfire, to become a box in the center.

References:

Little More

This is the same as Little except that the centers, after doing their Step and Fold, add a Box Circulate.

References:

direction Loop n

The dancers do a Run in the indicated direction passing by the indicated number of matrix spots, not including the starting spot. Those spots may be occupied by real dancers or not; unlike with Run, if there are real dancers they don't move.

The direction is most often "Left" or "Right", but can also be "In" or "Out" relative to the center of the set. Note that n indicates the number of spots to skip past. "Loop 2" means to pass two spots, ending in the third. Moving to the immediately adjacent spot would involve passing no spots, so that would be a "Loop 0".

References:

Mini Chase

From a box with all leaders, the belles do their part of Shakedown while the beaus do their part of Partner Tag.

This is almost always done from back-to-back couples, in which case you will find yourself in a right-handed box, holding right hands with the person with whom you started as a couple (same as if you had done a Chase Right with that person).

References:

Once Removed call

The dancers are consider as two group, according to their location in planes/slices perpendicular to the long axis of the overall formation. The dancers in each set of alternating planes are considered to be one group, and each group does the named call, ending back in alternating planes/slices.

This concept can be applied to formations of many different shapes. But the most common cases are 2x4 (e.g., parallel waves or columns) and 1x8 (e.g., tidal wave). In the case of a 2x4, each group will be a 2x2 box. In the case of a 1x8, each group will be a 1x4.

This concept can also be applied to a formation with fewer than eight spots, as long as they can be grouped into slices perpendicular to the long axis of that formation. For example, in a wave there are two groups each consisting of a couple; in a two-faced line there are two groups each consisting of a mini-wave.

The resulting shape of each group, after doing the named call, does not have to be the same as the starting shape; for example a box might change to a line or vice versa. However, cases where the shape does not change are often easier to do, and in many such cases it is possible for each group to basically do the call as usual, just spread out among the planes/slices that belong to their group.

In more difficult cases, a variety of methods are used to achieve the end result. In particularly difficult cases, it may be necessary for the dancers of each group to assemble together on one side of the square, do the call, and then reposition themselves back into alternating planes/slices.

References:

Patch somebody

This is a two-part call, starting from a couple or mini-wave:
  • Hinge
  • the designated dancers U-Turn Back (in the direction they turned for the hinge)

Note that
  • The hinge can be a partner hinge.
  • Who should u-turn back is evaluated at the start of the action, before the hinge, even though the turning doesn't happen until after the hinge. For example, starting from a couple one dancer is a beau and the other is a belle, but after the hinge they will both be beaus; in this case for "Patch the Beaus" only the original beaus would be turning around for the second part.

References:

Peel (or Trail) to a Diamond

From an appropriate box of four or Z, the leaders do their part of Peel Off (or Trail Off) while the trailers step forward and Hinge.

From a non-t-bone starting formation, you should expect to find yourself in some kind of diamond. From a mini-wave box, Peel to a Diamond ends in a facing diamond, while Trail to a Diamond ends in a regular diamond.

References:

Perk Up

From parallel lines (normally waves):
  • Circulate
  • 1/2 Split Circulate
  • then:
    • Those in the center Hinge, Box Circulate, Trade.
    • Those on the outside circulate twice.
From parallel waves, the original leaders will become the centers, while the original trailers will be on outside. Because the second part is 1/2 Split Circulate, those outside dancers will be doing their circulates in a clockwise or counter-clockwise direction, depending on the handedness of the original waves.

References:

Plan Ahead

Most commonly from facing lines:
  • The centers Touch 1/4 (or if already holding right hands, Hinge), then Cross Concentric Vertical Tag (walking all the way past the center spots), then "first left next right", individually turning around halfway, to form a couple facing in.
  • The ends walk past one person then continue walking around the square (like the beginning of Load the Boat), meet the next person by the right and Hinge, then Cross Concentric Vertical 1/2 Tag (into the center) and Face In.
Note that the ends become centers and vice versa, and everybody ends up as a couple facing the center of the set. From facing lines (or a tidal wave), the result is beginning DPT.

References:

Rally

Most commonly from a 1/4 or 3/4 tag:
  • The centers Step and Fold and then Peel and Trail, while
  • the ends 1/4 Right, Counter Rotate, then Right or Left (whichever is toward the center) Roll to a Wave
This starts just like Little and the "Left" and "Scoot and" variations apply in the same way.

From a 1/4 Tag, Scoot and Rally ends in a tidal wave of the same handedness as the original center wave.

References:

Reach Out

From a box of four, the trailers 1/2 Box Circulate and flip away (like a Run outward) to become the ends of a four-person formation, while the leaders Box Circulate 1 1/2 to become the centers.

From a mini-wave box, the result is a wave. From tandem couples, the result is a one-faced line. From a typical t-boned box, the result is a diamond.

References:

Recoil

This is a simple two-part call, starting from facing couples or other appropriate box. The action is simply:
  • Box Recycle
  • Step and Fold
After the Box Recycle you will be in a wave, and then after the Step and Fold you will be back in a box again. You should expect to find yourself in a left-handed box if you started in a right-handed box or facing couples, or in a right-handed box if you started in a left-handed box.

References:

Reverse Cut/Flip the Diamond

From a diamond, "Reverse Cut the Diamond" means that the centers trade and spread, while "Reverse Flip the Diamond" means that the centers flip outward (like a phantom Run). In either case, the points do a Diamond Circulate to become centers of a line.

Note that the term "reverse" in these calls can be thought of as applying to the roles of the centers and points (which ones do the Diamond Circulate) and to the direction that the centers go (outward rather than inward).

References:

Ripple

Ripple consists of a series of trades along a wave (or other line), starting with the designated dancer and starting toward the center. "Ripple the Wave" means to continue the trading until the far end of the wave. "Ripple n" means to stop after n trades. In a tidal wave the action is done in each half, unless the modifier "Grand" is added or n is specified and would require crossing the very center.

References:

Rotary call

This concept is a generalization of the call "Rotary Spin". Those who come into the center, after stepping to a left-handed wave, do the named call (instead of Cast Off 3/4). Those coming to the outside still do a Courtesy Spin and Roll. The ending formation will depend on the named call; common examples are "Rotary Mix" which ends in right-handed diamonds, and "Rotary Switch to a Diamond" which ends in an hourglass.

References:

Rotate fraction

From a box with all dancers in couples, each couple turns 1/4 (as a couple) to have their left shoulder toward the center of the box, forming a left-handed two-faced line, then turn that line the given fraction (e.g., for 1/4 do a Couples Hinge, for 1/2 do a Couples Trade).

Other ways of thinking about the direction of the initial turn:

  • Face "promenade direction" within the box.
  • As Couples Zag Zig
At C-2 and C-3A this call is mostly used from parallel lines, in which case the action is done "split" (within each of the two side-by-side boxes), but it can also be applied to a single box, either named explicitly (e.g., "Centers Rotate 1/2") or implicitly through a concept (e.g., "Clover and Rotate 1/4").

References:

Scatter Circulate

Almost always from some kind of parallel lines:
  • The ends do a Split Circulate.
  • The out-facing center does a Cross Over Circulate.
  • The in-facing center does a crossover action in the center box.
The most common starting position is parallel two-faced lines, and the result is parallel waves of the same handedness.

References:

Scoot the Diamond

This is a three-part call, starting from a 1/4 tag:
  • Scoot Back
  • the ends turn 1/4 left or right, depending on handedness of the centers
  • Diamond Circulate
Starting from a right-handed 1/4 tag, the result will be a right-handed diamond. Starting from a left-handed 1/4 tag, the result will be a left-handed diamond.

For "Finish Scoot the Diamond", if you are an end be careful to note the handhold in the center to decide which way to turn.

References:

Shazam

This is a simple two-part call, normally starting from a mini-wave:
  • Arm Turn 1/4
  • U-Turn Back
If you start in a right-handed mini-wave you will end in a left-handed mini-wave. If you start in a left-handed mini-wave you will end in a right-handed mini-wave.

References:

Single call

Single is a concept that creates a "half-sized" version of a call, working with half as many dancers (2 instead of 4, or 4 instead of 8). The basic idea is already present at lower levels, and its general application can be very tricky so is reserved for C-4, but it is commonly applied to several specific calls at C-3A.

original call [# of dancers]single version [# of dancers]also known astypical starting formation
Bounce [4]Single Bounce [2] mini-wave
Checkmate the Column [8]Single Checkmate [4]Box Checkmate, Split Checkmateany box of four
Ferris Wheel [8]Single Ferris Wheel [4] mini-wave box
Polly Wally [8]Single Polly Wally [4] any column of four
Rotary Spin [8]Single Rotary Spin [4] single eight chain
Shakedown [4]Single Shakedown [2] back-to-back dancers
Transfer the Column [8]Single Transfer [4]Box Transfer, Split Transfermini-wave box
Turn to a Line [4]Single Turn to a Line [2] generalized tandem
Wheel and Deal [4]Single Wheel and Deal [2]Single Wheelcouple, mini-wave

Note that there are some calls whose names begin with the word "Single" that do not fit this pattern, e.g., Single Circle to a Wave, Single Rotate. In addition, the two-word phrase "Single File" has a different meaning.

References:

Single Cross Trade and Wheel

This is a three-part call, starting from a box:
  • Hinge
  • Centers Trade
  • As Couples Step and Fold

"Single Cross and Wheel" is the same but without the second part: Hinge followed by Step and Fold.

Note: These two calls are part of a larger family of calls, distinguished by the inclusion of the words "Grand", "Single", and "Trade".

References:

Single File call

Single File is a concept that can be applied to some calls which would normally be done from a box, to turn them into a call done instead from facing tandems. It is applied at C-3A to facing Recycle and Recoil.

From facing tandems, to do a Single File Recycle the leaders do the part that would normally be done by the beaus -- they step forward to meet each other, right-shoulder to right-shoulder, and U-Turn Back (to their right), ending up holding left hands with each other. Meanwhile, the trailers veer to their left to become the ends of the resulting wave.

Single File Recoil is Single File Recycle followed by Step and Fold.

Note: "Single File" is also applied with a similar meaning to Dixie Style to a Wave and its variations, to make clear that they are to be done by facing tandems, even though that starting formation is already allowed by those calls.

References:

Single Rotate fraction

From a box, each dancer turns 1/4 to have their left shoulder toward the center of the box, then box counter rotate the given fraction.

Other ways of thinking about the direction of the initial turn:

  • Individually face "promenade direction" within the box.
  • Zag Zig
At C-2 and C-3A this call is mostly used from parallel lines, in which case the action is done "split" (within each of the two side-by-side boxes), but it can also be applied to a single box, either named explicitly (e.g., "Centers Single Rotate 3/4") or implicitly through a concept (e.g., "Transfer and Single Rotate 1/2").

References:

Snap the Lock

From any kind of parallel lines:
  • Everyone Partner Tag.
  • The new ends Partner Tag, while the new centers Step to a Wave, Lockit, and Step Thru.
Ends in lines back-to-back, with the original centers now on the ends and the original ends now in the center.

Note: "Snap" means Partner Tag. The original centers do this twice, once with the ends, and then once with each other.

References:

Split Swap

This starts from facing couples and is related to Swap Around. Actually everybody goes to the same spot as for Swap Around -- the only difference is that they end facing a different direction. The beau does a 1/4 Right and Box Circulate while the belle does a Box Circulate and 1/4 Right. In either case, the action is considered to be one smooth motion, so it can't be fractionalized and everybody can Roll. You should expect to find yourself as a couple with the same person with whom you started, but half sashayed.

References:

Split Trade Circulate

From a box of four, the leaders do a Box Circulate while the trailers do a cross over circulate (within the box, to become leaders in the diagonally opposite spot).

This call is most commonly used from a box consisting of one right-handed mini-wave and one left-handed mini-wave. But it can also be done from certain other kinds of boxes, such as facing couples (in which case is it equivalent to Cross Trail Thru) and back-to-back couples (in which case it is equivalent to Partner Trade).

References:

Stable call

Stable is a concept that means to do all the actions of the call but without changing facing direction, i.e., remaining facing the same wall. Everything else is done as usual, and all the dancers end up in exactly the same spots -- but because their facing direction may be different the ending formation is often very different (e.g., columns instead of lines).

The ideal way to dance a call Stable is to actually stay facing the same wall, while following the same path as normal. Note that this means that what would normally be a right or left shoulder pass might become instead a slide nose-to-nose or back-to-back. This can be confusing at first, but usually easy enough for simple calls.

For calls that are very complex, with lots of parts, it may not be possible to keep track of the actions doing it this way. An alternative method is "do the call, face the wall", i.e., do the call normally and then, at the end, turn to face your original direction if necessary. This, however, requires that you be able to remember that original facing direction. Also, if some dancers are using one method and others the other, they can easily confuse each other. So it is best to reserve this method for cases where it is really impractical to do it without turning.

References:

Stack the Line

Normally from a left-handed box, a right-handed box, or tandem couples -- everybody does a 1/4 In, then the original leaders walk forward to become beaus, while the others slide over if necessary to become beaus (taking right hands with a person who walked forward). The result is normally a right-handed box.

It is important in following this definition that dancers take note of whether they are leaders or trailers before they do anything else. (After they have done the 1/4 In it is too late, as they are all then trailers.)

Another way of keeping track of what's going on is to note that dancers who start in tandem will end up in tandem, with the same person. Your tandem (and your place in it) will remain the same -- the whole tandem just occupies a different pair of spots in the box.

References:

Step and call

This is a generalization of Step and Slide (A-1) and Step and Flip (C-1). The centers step ahead while the ends do the named call. A common example is "Step and Squeeze".

References:

Swap the Top

Starting from facing couples, the belles walk directly forward to meet each other, then turn 3/4 by the left to become the centers of a wave. Meanwhile, the beaus do a Run 1 1/2 to their right, becoming ends of that wave.

Note that this is related to Swap Around in that the beaus start by flipping to their right while the belles start by walking straight forward.

References:

Swap the Wave

Swap the Wave starts with a wave and results in back-to-back couples. The dancers whose left shoulders are toward the center of the wave step forward to become the belles. The other dancers walk to their right, around each other, turning to face the opposite wall, and step forward to become the beaus. This call is related to Swap Around, in that dancers end in the same positions they would for Swap Around, if they had started in facing couples that could have stepped forward to form the wave.

Since the action feels slightly different from a right-handed vs. a left-handed wave, the action is often described separately for the two cases. From a right-handed wave, it is the centers who are stepping forward to become the belles, while the ends do what feels like a Tag the Line Right and then step forward to becme the beaus. From a left-handed wave, it is the ends who are stepping forward to become the belles, while the centers walk around each other by doing a Slip, and then step forward to become the beaus.

References:

tag Your Neighbor

A tagging call will be identified using its standard combining form:
  • "Tag" for "Tag the Line"
  • "Flip" for "Flip the Line"
  • "Vertical Tag" for "Vertical Tag the Line"
The action is:
  • Do the tagging call to the 1/2 tag position (resulting in a box)
  • Follow Your Neighbor
The most common combinations are: "Tag Your Neighbor", "Flip Your Neighbor", and "Vertical Tag Your Neighbor".

Note that this is just like "tag Back" except that the second part is a Follow Your Neighbor rather than a Scoot Back.

The variation "tag Your Cross Neighbor" means to replace the Follow Your Neighbor with a Cross Your Neighbor. The variation "tag Your Criss Cross Neighbor" means replace the Follow Your Neighbor with a Criss Cross Your Neighbor. So, for example, "Flip Your Criss Cross Neighbor" means do a Flip the Line 1/2, then from the resulting box do a Criss Cross Your Neighbor.

References:

Touch By fraction by fraction

Typically from a beginning double pass thru formation, those directly facing Touch (step to a right-handed mini-wave) and then Arm Turn the first fraction and Spread, then the others move in and Touch and Arm Turn the second fraction.

Instead of a second fraction, another call can be named to be done by those facing dancers, e.g. "Touch By 1/4 by Slide Thru". If only fractions are given, the ending position is normally either a two-faced line or a diamond.

References:

Travel Thru

This is a simple two-part call, normally starting from facing couples:
  • Pass Thru
  • As Couples 1/4 Right
The result is a right-handed two-faced line.

References:

Truck

Truck means to move one matrix position sideways (without moving forward or back). The direction is normally left for the boys and right for the girls. "Reverse Truck" switches this – the boys move one spot to their right and the girls one spot to their left.

References:

Turn to a Line

This starts in a box of four and ends in a line of four. In one smooth motion, each leader faces right and each trailer faces left, forming a momentary tandem, they walk forward past the other two dancers and turn one more quarter in the same direction.

The turning and walking forward and turning again is basically the same action as for Turn and Deal; the difference is that here the action transforms a box into a line rather than a line into a box. As with Turn and Deal, each individual dancer ends up facing the opposite wall, so if you start as a couple you will end as a couple, and if you start in a mini-wave you will end in an opposite-handed mini-wave. If you start in a right-handed mini-wave box, you will end in a left-handed wave, and vice versa.

References:

Unwrap the formation

The dancers circulate and walk forward to form parallel columns as follows:
  • The dancer who is both closest to the center and facing in walks forward without turning to become #1 in a column.
  • The dancers in the other positions fill in the remaining positions in the column according to how many spots they would need to formation circulate to be in such a position - a dancer who only needs to circulate one spot becomes #2, and so on.
Note: In the case of twin diamonds or an hourglass, it is the infacing points who become #1 in the column. In the case of point-to-point diamonds or a galaxy, it will be the infacing centers.

In the most common cases and with real dancers, the feel of this call is as if the other dancers are "following" the first dancer. However, this is not very helpful in the case of facing diamonds or similar formations, or when dancing with phantoms. In those cases it is usually more helpful to just concentrate on spots and where you started in the formation. You may also find it helpful to become familiar with where the people in certain starting positions end up, e.g., from a pair of diamonds or an hourglass the very centers will always end up as #4 in a column.

References:

Vertical call

"Vertical" is a concept that allows a call which would normally be done from facing tandems to instead be done from a box. The dancers in each pair (couple or mini-wave) all face toward the center (turning around 180 degrees as necessary) with one of them in the lead, according to the same rules used for Vertical Tag:
  • for a mini-wave, the trailer goes first, followed by the leader
  • for a couple, the belle goes first, followed by the beau
Another way of describing this is that everybody does a "Vertical 0/4 Tag", and then the named call.

A common application of this concept is "Vertical Dixie Style to a Wave". Note that if the dancers are already in facing couples, the "Vertical" is not normally needed since this call already has built into it the idea of the belle going in front for that case. But adding "Vertical" allows this call (and its variations, like Dixie Diamond) to also be done from back to back couples and other kinds of boxes.

References:

Walk Out to a Wave

From parallel columns:
  • #1 and #2 Trail Off, then Ends Run
  • #3 Circulate, then U-Turn Back (toward the center)
  • #4 Circulate, then Press Out
The action of this call feels like the action at the end of Spin Chain and Exchange the Gears.

From ordinary parallel columns, the result is parallel waves of the same handedness. This is also sometimes called from beginning or completed DPT – the dancers all do their part, and the result is inverted lines.

References:

Wheel the Ocean/Sea

This starts with couples in a box -- normally either back-to-back couples or tandem couples. First, whichever couples are facing out do a Wheel Around (to their left) -- after which the couples will be facing regardless of how they started. Then, for "Ocean" the belles cross, resulting in a right-handed box. For "Sea", the belles walk while the beaus dodge, resulting in a left-handed box. Note that only the couples that were facing out do the Wheel Around. If a couple is already facing in, they only do the second part of this call.

References:

Wind the Bobbin

From columns:
  • First the leads (1 and 3 in each column) Peel Off and the trailers take hands to become centers.
  • Then the new ends (those who peeled) circulate two positions around the outside while the centers Cast Off 3/4, Slip, Cast Off 3/4.

The result is parallel waves, with handedness opposite that of the starting columns.

Note that the first part for everybody is like the first part of Peel the Top, and the remaining action for the new centers is the same as Finish Spin Chain Thru.

References:

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